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Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: DCT vs QuickShifter  (Read 1937 times)

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Offline ojo

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DCT vs QuickShifter
« on: December 11, 2011, 12:27:15 PM »
For those interested as an alternative for DCT have a look on the "Quickshifter" system. Google search brings you up a lot of it.
Could it be a alternative on Crosstourer too - beeing a much "lighter" system? You could similar as in DCT shift you gears "automatically" depending on system with the touch of your finger ... there are a couple of aftermarkets suppliers out there which could fit any bike as they say ...

Any thoughts from you out there?
Around the world and back ... driven Honda motorbikes all over Europe, Australia, NewZealand, Japan, Russia .....
my latest trip: http://www.austral.omania.ch/index.html

Offline Captain Scarlet

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Re: DCT vs QuickShifter
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2011, 03:17:04 PM »
Quickshifters aren't an alternative to DCT as they are used on a multi geared-gearbox and only work on upshifts; they are not hand operated either. They just enable you to shift up a gear, via conventional foot activated gear shift without having to roll off the throttle or depress the clutch lever. This provide a faster shift, but only when the engine is under load. I.e. Accelerating fairly hard. If you try to use them whilst cruising, they will just baulk and don't like to shift.

Companies like BMW offer them as an optional extra on select models (K13S & SRR), as does Triumph (Daytona 675R). I've had them on a few very fast bikes and they make perfect sense on those race-replica or hyper-bikes with over 160 hp and 180 mph top-speeds. However I don't think their operational delivery suits the touring nature of Adventure bikes. Of course you can thrash an Adventure bike through the gears everywhere, take it to a track day and treat it like a sports bike and it may surprise its rider and indeed others as to just how well it does. But if the rider is using it like that all the time, they probably have to be honest with themselves and ask if they have brought the right bike or not for that moment in their riding time.

A number of aftermarket manufacturers offer bolt on quick-shifters, the best known probably being Translogic. I've had bikes like the K1300S and S1000RR with quick-shifters and I love them and miss having one on my Diavel Carbon Red. But as mentioned IMHO I don't think they suit the Adventure genre. Put it this way if BMW thought they could sell 100,000 by offering them as part of the premium package for the GS they would, but haven't have they?

Suzuki's Burgman 650 Executive maxi-scooter operates more like the VFR1200DCT. It too has an automatic gearbox, with handlebar push-button manual change. Naturally this isn't actually changing gears in a manual gearbox, because the gearbox is a single gear automatic. Rather it is forcing the illusion of artificial gears. I.e. letting the gearbox rev quicker and for longer, or vice versa, depending what the push-button you control is asking of it. Back in auto-mode it acts just like an automatic car working out the best gear and revs depending on things like how quickly and how far you crack open the throttle for instance. The Suzuki has an extra trick of sport mode, to enable sportier default parameters whilst still in auto-mode. This enables it to be quicker away from the traffic lights when the rider wants to put some quicker distance between themselves and the surrounding traffic.

The theory of an auto-box can be appealing for touring. However the main difficulty is getting the bike to act perfectly when, for instance, performing tight u-turns from a stationery starting point, or when travelling up a roadside curb to park the bike on hard standing. This is when the deft touch of a clutch lever lets the rider fettle infinite feel and control through the hand lever. In the past bikes like the FJR1300 failed pretty miserably in these sorts of common riding situations lunging and jerking the delivery of the bike, which provides the potential for the rider to drop the bike at best and is probably dangerous at worst.

Apparently the VFR system is more evolved and refined in this respect, but still far from perfect. The auto box has sold in far fewer numbers than Honda expected. I have ridden both bikes before, but have never tried the FJR or VFR auto-versions, so I cannot pass personal comment based on my own experience. I have however met owners of both and each told me that they wish they'd bought the conventional clutch-lever controlled bike; but just to balance things I am sure other auto-box owners are happy enough. Assuming I do buy a CrossTourer the auto-box is not for me personally. But having said that, I don't think I would now go back to driving a manual gearbox car, so I can certainly understand why people might prefer the option. And I think we all appreciate having the choice at least.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 03:37:42 PM by Captain Scarlet »

Offline Freaky

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Re: DCT vs QuickShifter
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2011, 04:31:21 PM »
 :460:

Offline Giovannino

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Re: DCT vs QuickShifter
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2011, 04:54:18 PM »
 :460: :460:
Giovannino,
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Offline ojo

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Re: DCT vs QuickShifter
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2011, 09:52:29 PM »
Thanks Captain Scarlet ... very interesting view of things  :460: from my point of view - now - i agree that quickshifters are probably not for the adventure kind of bike.
Around the world and back ... driven Honda motorbikes all over Europe, Australia, NewZealand, Japan, Russia .....
my latest trip: http://www.austral.omania.ch/index.html