Author Topic: Time for a change  (Read 4101 times)

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Offline Hartley

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Time for a change
on: October 26, 2020, 12:09:41 PM
With my CT approaching 4 yrs old now and getting near 30000 miles I’m feeling it’s time to move on.
 It’s my second Crosstourer, my first being a manual so over the last 7 years I’ve done about 50k on the big Hondas.
If Honda has a “proper” replacement for the CT I’d more than likely buy another, sadly they’ve given up on the bike.

Realistically there are few bikes that I see an an option. Africa Twin is great looking and would enable me to stick with a DCT.  But I wonder if going down to under 100 bhp for two up touring would be frustrating.

A bike that has no such power issues is the KTM 1290 but chain drive, questionable reliability and , in my opinion, a hideous front end rules it out.

Triumph Explorer is a very strong contender, always liked them and they have some good deals on too.

But, the bike I’d most like to put in the garage is a GS. I’ve fancied one for a long time and loved it last time I rode one.

However, I find myself struggling to justify the fact that I’d have to hand over my CT and in the region of 11 to £14000  to get onboard a BM or most of the others. Bikes have got so ridiculously expensive over the last few years and for what? Yes they’ve got all the tech and I’m sure it’s very clever but I do wonder about some systems on these bikes. We all know as riders that you need eyes everywhere when riding. Do I need to be looking at a screen and scrolling though endless menus to make sure my suspension is set to M1 mode and not M6?
Out of all the gadgets there are on bikes now the only one I’d really like on my CT is cruise.

Added to this is I have two other bikes, a 2002 XJR1300 and a Royal Enfield Himalayan.  The Yamaha doesn’t even have ABS, the Himalayan does but that’s about it( oh it’s got a compass).  Both these bikes never fail to put a smile on my face and that’s why I ride a bike.

My CTs have taken me to the Alps, Dolomites and Pyrenees, I’ve seen the Italian lakes and rode the highest roads in Europe on them.  Would I have enjoyed the trips any more on a tech laden bike?
At some point the Honda will go but for the time being I really cannot see any reason to change.


Paul


#1

Offline Dave60

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #1 on: October 26, 2020, 12:54:44 PM
Nice write up Paul
Exactly my predicament, having owned my VFR800 Vtec and age getting the better of me, well actually more the Arthritis than the age 😀
Buying my crosstourer was the best decision on both the power for two up touring and more upright.
But it’s the weight that gets in the way sometimes,
Admittedly I think you have to plan more when coming to say a junction or similar, apart from that it does everything I need it to do.

The GS isn’t particularly much lighter but it’s probably because of the lower centre of gravity with the boxer engine and as you say all that “ electrickity “ 😳

Dave

#2

Offline DaveinNC

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #2 on: October 27, 2020, 11:09:00 AM
If it ain't broke don't fix it. At 30,000 miles your bike is just starting to break-in. I plan on taking mine to 200K before I think about another if I live that long. 
"Dave"

If You're Gonna Be Stupid, You Better Be Hard, because stupid hurts!

#3

Offline andyrob

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #3 on: October 27, 2020, 02:29:47 PM
I would say you are getting it right.

As that is the conclusion I always come to! :008:

Sure I have said this to you before but...

My CT is for 2 up touring and I want solid and dependable and fun when you get to where your going. And of course back. CT ticks that for me. Its a 7yr old 2013 from new and still looks it @ 32,000 plus.

So maybe its just winter blues?

I always coo at the new shiney shiney with all the new baubles. But the realisation comes quicker the older I get that I dont actually want all that stuff. So I hop on a bike and go for a ride.

I kept it and bought something else different, (Speed Twin) a sunday best that never sees rain (ok that did not last long up here) and is a bit of a sleeper and needs a bit of "modding." But you have got that covered with a couple others to choose from.

So tog up mate and go for a ride, thats what it is about.

#4

Offline Dave56

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #4 on: October 27, 2020, 07:33:35 PM
Paul, I couldn’t agree with you more. How many people truly utilise or make use of all those bells & whistles, very, very few I would suspect.
As you know Paul, I’ve just gone through the same “shall I shan’t I” ritual with regards the CT.
My bike of possible choice was to be the new 1100 Africa Twin.
Took one for a test ride, which I have to say impressed me, on my return to the dealers and after much discussion a fare trade-in was agreed and a price given for a brand new AT Plus. My response was that I’ll have to sleep on it.
Then during a lengthy ride home I realised that the smile on my face was as wide as the day I took delivery of my first manual CT - god, this is one impressive motorcycle - why oh why am I even considering changing.
Like Paul an amount of £11+ would be required to allow the change  :005:.
On reflection and after a restless nights sleep my decision was a definite Nooooooo, while the new AT is an impressive piece of kit, as Paul states in his original post, do I really need all those bells and whistles, no I don’t and that £11+ will buy me plenty of fuel and ferry tickets and I’m confident my CT smile will not be getting any the less beaming the more miles I ride.
So in conclusion and as like Paul, the CT will be at some point be changed, but not for a while yet. :028:
"The more the miles, the bigger the smiles"

#5

Offline Jfro5867

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #5 on: October 28, 2020, 04:52:15 PM
Nice write up. Think the winter blues hits us all. Just been out for a ride and I honestly don't know what I would replace the CT with anyway. At the speeds I hover around       (60mph) it's so comfortable and just effortless. I am really taken with the DCT. Not that my pockets are deep enough but probably the only bike would be the DCT Goldwing bagger, but I don't want all that gizmo stuff anyway plus it's a step too far into mile munching for me. I feel the CT is still very much a practical, robust all rounder and it still amazes me how well balanced it is. I often don't put a foot down at junctions. I did try an AT and I liked it but prefer the CT.

#6

Offline mzflorida

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #6 on: October 28, 2020, 07:59:46 PM
I am with you all.   I keep on going back and forth looking for something better.   I have to tell you I do love the DCT.   If the rumored 850 variant of the NC with DCT were to reach the USA, I do think I would be very tempted.  80 or 90 HP and 120lbs lighter would be just fine for the kind of riding I find myself moving more toward.  I'll make a change sometime in the next few years.   

#7

Offline Younger06

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Re: Time for a change
Reply #7 on: October 28, 2020, 11:12:59 PM
It'll be interesting to see what platform the rumoured blown Africa Twin engine ends up in !?!? (hopefully it'll have 19/17 wheels)
"Howya horsebox"