Author Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT  (Read 1162 times)

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  • Offline Toeman

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    Offline Toeman

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    Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    on: Jun 25, 2020, 07.50 pm
    Jun 25, 2020, 07.50 pm
    Coming from a Yamaha touring bike with fairly high handlebar sweep I find that the relatively minimal handlebar sweep causes a lot of discomfort in my wrists causing me to continually shift my grip position.
    I am currently exploring switching out my bars for ones with more sweep. I have also considered an offset riser to raise and bri g forward the bars a little. I don’t know if this will help but would appreciate any suggestions.

  • Offline mzflorida   us

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    Offline mzflorida

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #1 on: Jun 26, 2020, 11.08 am
    Jun 26, 2020, 11.08 am
    Yes.  Rox risers will help with the fatigue.  The cable bundle on the right side will be tight but you can remove it from the triple clamp with one screw and secure them with cable ties.   You should be able to move from lock to lock where tension just begins on the throttle cable on the left lock. 

  • Offline David_S_Walker   gb

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    Offline David_S_Walker

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #2 on: Jun 26, 2020, 01.57 pm
    Jun 26, 2020, 01.57 pm
    Hello,

    I suffered from wrist fatigue but stumbled over a pair of Crampbusters which bit over each grip and support your wrist. Cheaper option maybe?

    EBay item number 361102747409 are the jones I use as an example.

    Widely available on eBay.

    Best regards,

    David :028:
    Last Edit: Jun 26, 2020, 01.59 pm by David_S_Walker

  • Offline Toeman

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    Offline Toeman

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #3 on: Jun 27, 2020, 05.17 am
    Jun 27, 2020, 05.17 am
    Thank you very much for the advice

  • Offline Toeman

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    Offline Toeman

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #4 on: Jun 27, 2020, 05.19 am
    Jun 27, 2020, 05.19 am
    Is around 1 inch on the rox riser about the most I should go with?

  • Offline Hatch-

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    Offline Hatch-

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #5 on: Jul 13, 2020, 01.43 am
    Jul 13, 2020, 01.43 am
    I got some rox risers, a cramp buster AND a cruise control on mine, between all three of those it's a thing of the past.

  • Offline VFR1200XDH

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    Offline VFR1200XDH

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    Re: Wrist fatigue on 2017 CT
    Reply #6 on: Jul 13, 2020, 07.32 pm
    Jul 13, 2020, 07.32 pm
    Believe it or not, your seat makes a big difference on how much pressure you put on your wrists and that does affect throttle hand fatigue.

    Having gone through well over 45 different motorcycles and chased the riser route, deal with the seat. Its often not enough just to have a comfortable seat but how if affects your position on the bike is as important as just adding rise or pullback to the bars, they work in concert with each other. Often its not just the throttle return that adds fatigue but where you sit in relation to the bars.

    Risers can give you some height and pullback but where your seat places you can affect pullback and sometimes even eliminate the need for risers.

    I too felt some throttle hand fatigue just in the short time I've had my DCT model but changing the seat which changed where I sat made such a difference my plans for adding risers evaporated. Gone was the pressure on my wrists and with that, no more wrist fatigue. Just something to consider as sometimes we chase the wrong end to solve problems.