Author Topic: Prospective new owner  (Read 1885 times)

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#8

Offline Plane Dr

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #8 on: August 31, 2019, 10:39:54 PM
I came off an 05 GS that was added to basically a GSA.

So any bike I looked at required bags, lights, seat, windscreen, maybe suspension.  So give or take they were similar.  The VFR was 5k cheaper.  I also knew what KTM and BMW cost to maintain.  At that point it also came down to features.

So many friends with Honda’s only ever change wear items.  Add DCT, I could live without some bells and whistles.
Bikes are like women.  What you want and what you think you want change after the first ride.

#9

Offline Clifton

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #9 on: September 13, 2019, 03:05:17 PM
*Originally Posted by ninjabika [+]
hi

....now the quetions, bare with me, i quite like the idea of the dct obviously a test ride will figure that out, how do you get out of the urge to just rev it at the lights ?.

ive seen some new ones offered around the 12k mark, is it worth buying a new one as there are lots of low mileage ones about, fully kitted out, are the 2016 on bikes nuch better than the earlier ones ?

i had a vfr1200 a 2010 model and the suspension was rubbish, actually ruined my europe tour i came back on a wednesday and bought the GSA on the saturday lol, has the suspension got better ?

are the aluminium panniers and top box any good ? they look quite cheap, is it worth getting them, ive a friend who owns a fab shop who can make me some and fit them to a givi rack



Greetings, I came from a 2014 GSA myself. Also I love having the DCT on this motorcycle!
As far as how to avoid the urge to rev a DCT model? After the first smash into the car in front of you should do it. :)  Seriously I've not had that problem at all and I ride other non-DCT motorcycles as well. The fact you aren't holding in the clutch helps remind you I suppose.

Prices are pretty affordable on used as well as new ones here also. 2016/17's (after fees) seem to go for around $10-$12K, I paid a total of $11,800 for my 2017 DCT here in WV earlier this year. There's a new 2017 manual at a dealer up the road for $9,900 ($9,500 + $400 fee.)
This is the only one I've had so I can't comment on how it compares to the earlier version. I generally find the need to make some modifications on any motorcycle I buy just to make it "fit and work" for me. On this one they consisted of a seat (Corbin), throttle tamer, 20mm bar risers, and the mentioned Givi saddle bags. I may install a center stand and probably heated grips.

I find the rear suspension to be ok but the front is pretty harsh on dirt roads and broken pavement, I now have the fork preload set to the softest along with running about 3 psi less in both tires than they spec in the manual and it's certainly better, good enough for me. And the front seems to be loosening up a bit after some miles which has helped.

The factory luggage is probably about the same as came on my Africa Twin which works "OK" but is expensive, pretty flimsy and side loading. I took the advice of some on this forum and bought 37L Givi Trekkor Outbacks and find them a lot more robust, hold more, as well as nicer to use compared to the factory bags. I've never cared for adding a box on the rear rack instead I just strap a Drybag on the back when I need more capacity. The Trekkor bag lids are a good place to attach  things like your tent, Thermorest, Kermit chair, etc. Plus I plan on using these on any future bike I might end up with, just have to buy the mounts themself.
Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 03:10:18 PM by Clifton
No car is as fun to drive as any motorcycle is to ride.

#10

Offline Pcoz88

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #10 on: January 18, 2020, 08:52:58 PM
following.

#11

Offline Pcoz88

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #11 on: February 03, 2020, 11:49:30 AM
So is the CT similar to a bmw gs/gas? As far as abilities? Not trying to start a argument.  Doing my do diligence.  Thank you.

#12

Offline Pcoz88

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #12 on: February 04, 2020, 08:20:41 PM
 :187:  :187: bump??

#13

Offline Pcoz88

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #13 on: February 12, 2020, 12:51:59 PM
So is there a existing post about the CT compared to  BMW gs/gas? Thank you.

#14

Offline Plane Dr

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #14 on: February 12, 2020, 01:12:39 PM
I'm not aware of a current thread.  But the BMW is definitely the standard.  Going in I knew the shortcomings of the VFR but I also had a good idea of the BMW's.  I am still pleased with the VFR it fits my needs across the board.  I loved my GS but even being an older version just gave me too many worries.  It never broke but as it got older the thought of the spend to fix it worried me.

Since August I did the seat and windscreen and now it is heaven.  I don't hesitate to just go.  Now I worry more about where my next fuel stop is than anything else.
Bikes are like women.  What you want and what you think you want change after the first ride.

#15

Offline Dave56

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Re: Prospective new owner
Reply #15 on: February 12, 2020, 01:26:16 PM
As you perhaps appreciate Pcoz88 the question that your posing is exceptionally subjective as if nothing else they are two entirely differing beasts.
I’ve owned 2 GS’s and 2 Crosstourer’s so I’ll give you my opinion on both, but I can assure you that someone will know doubt come along and offer a totally opposing opinion.
My last GS I bought new in 2007 so as you can appreciate things on the GS front have progressed somewhat since then, but I found it comfortable and economical if, in comparison to the CT a little agricultural. I don’t however do ANY off road riding so cannot give you an opinion as to its off road credentials suffice to say that many riders do.
I do have to say however that I did have numerous reliability issues during my ownership which in the end prompted me to eventually get rid. These ranged from faulty ECU units - 3, failed batteries - 3, failed rear wheel bearings and during its annual service I was informed that the rear shock absorber needed to be replaced and all this after only 17,000 miles, non of which included a pillion.
This I feel is very poor from what is considered to be a quality manufacturer.
Now to CT ownership. My first, a manual, I bought new in 2013 and was immediately impressed by its awesome V4 which I found very responsive, smooth and with regards to economy, very similar to the GS.
Handling has been faultless and it can be hustled around the bends with ease once the suspension is set to its optimum best.
I also found the suspension, shall we say, adequate as has been well documented on this forum this appears to be the CT’s Achilles heal, but at least there’s no ESA suspension system to fail aka GS/GSA.
Build quality and overall finish is another thing that far supersede’s the GS.
Weight is another of the CT’s minus points. Not an issue when on the move but boy you know about when wheeling it around the yard. The same could not be said for the GS as it’s centre of gravity was a lot lower.
Owing to slight arthritis in the wrists I’ve now moved onto the DCT version of the CT and have found this version in a class of it’s owe with regards road manners it’s just as good as the manual version.
Once again I cannot vouch for its off road abilities.
In conclusion, I’ve taken my CT’s abroad on numerous occasions and each time I know that when I press that starter button the glorious V4 is going to strike up and get me, in comfort to my destination every time, this I couldn’t say for the GS.
Now I appreciate that this may not be the most comprehensive of “tests” but I’m sure your no doubt aware there are countless films on YouTube which would help you in forming an opinion as to which bike would best suit your needs and if you pose the same question on the GSerS forum you’ll get a totally differing response.
Good luck.
"The more the miles, the bigger the smiles"

 



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