Author Topic: Avon Trekriders  (Read 1153 times)

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Offline fastnlight

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Avon Trekriders
on: May 20, 2019, 02:20:10 PM
So I have the first couple hundred miles on the Avon Trekriders with some two up time and both paved and unpaved surfaces (no mud/sand). They are proving so far to be what they promised, a better handling 50/50 tire for someone looking to keep as much street handling and grip as possible, while having a significant amount of bite when the pavement ends. The feel on the road is great at high and low speeds with the best corner transition I have felt on this bike. The road holding, or grip, feels very similar to the stock Pirelli tires with much less bar looseness/wobble at high speeds (when I slap the bars) than the Mitas E07 Dakars I ran previously. The rolling feel is smoother than those tires, and grip feels more like a solid road tire. I ran about 20 miles of mixed rocky dirt roads yesterday through some messy recently logged areas, plus a favorite 4 mile stretch of deep and loose gravel and the tire has good feel in those conditions with it feeling just a bit more loose than the E07. I will say that braking and acceleration grip felt better than the E07 and closer to the Shinko 804/805 tires but with a bit less lateral stability at speed in the loose gravel. I wouldn't say the lateral feel was bad at all, just not the same as a knobby and just a bit less than the Mitas E07 in loose gravel conditions. I ran stock pressures which I am comparing to lower pressures run (28/36) on the E07 due to additional sidewall stiffness of that tire.

These Trekriders are lighter tires, with more flexible sidewalls, and will not likely protect the rim as much against hard hits such at rocks or pothole edges when compared to the dakar E07s which were very stiff tires.

They seem to trade just a small amount of overall unpaved performance for a significant improvement in paved handling and that is what I was hoping for on this bike. I mounted these at 14150 miles and the summer will quickly tell how long they last and I will report that on this thread of course. Favorite VFRX tire so far! (also ran Pirelli Scorpion Trail, Shinko 804/805, Mitas E07 Dakar)

https://photos.app.goo.gl/gyt7fJ8LBw7KibzYA

https://photos.app.goo.gl/2dvcJ2wgkkf2MGKw9

Greg
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Offline fastnlight

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #1 on: July 25, 2019, 02:12:17 PM
I am at the 2200 mile mark (running stock pressures) with the Trekriders and have to say they have done very well.   I just completed two separate trips, both with lots of dirt road riding amounting to over 500 miles off pavement including all surfaces except sand, and many miles of rocky roads up on north Vancouver Island.  This set is still doing great on the pavement, with the best grip and manners both wet and dry of any 50/50 tire I have used, plus great handling and feel in hard packed dirt, gravel, and rocks.   They do get you though muddy conditions, but not with the best feel on the front end.   I found it necessary to slow down and simply power through muddy sections instead of trying to ride through with any real authority.  Still impressive on their ability to power through without loading up and getting stuck.  I suspect they would be similar in sand but I only hit a few very short sections overall and did not get enough feel for it.

Rear tire at 2200miles began with 8mm of center tread height, now has 5mm and wearing as evenly as expected
https://photos.app.goo.gl/WdkbfGNyxpFR35fV9

Front tire at 2200miles began with 5mm of center tread height, now has 4mm and wearing as evenly as expected
https://photos.app.goo.gl/x26m9m3D4iGEvSWK9

It was surprising that none of the three bikes on the Vancouver Island grand loop experienced a flat, as the rocks on many sections were golf ball to softball sized, angular, and not mixed with any smaller material.  These surfaces were sharp, and I figured the Trekriders would be the first to get a cut resulting in a flat. (other tires on the trip were Mitas E07 and Kenda Big Block)

I can see a few spots where the Trekriders got cut between the blocks but they did not fail, and I am impressed and feel they went a little beyond there design intent on such a heavy machine.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/kYVivHrJJ9mU38Ci9

Very happy with these, and will plan to put another rear on once it gets down to about 2mm which should be in another approximately 2k miles.   Guessing at this point it will be a rear that lasts 4-5k miles with a liberal right hand. I will post an update of course.

Greg
Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 02:19:35 PM by fastnlight
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Offline fastnlight

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #2 on: September 26, 2019, 08:17:24 PM
So I just replaced the rear tire at 3100 miles.   I knew the rocky riding up north was hard on that tire, but after a spirited few hundred miles of twisty riding and warm tire temperatures.  I inspected the rear while hot and saw a few gaping cuts between the tread blocks that just didn't make me feel too confident.  The rear tread at center was down just below 4mm, and should have gone over 5k without too much trouble.  I bought another Trek rider and its now back on the road.   Still think its the best 50/50 tire for a rider who wants the best off pavement capability while sacrificing the least amount of road feel and handling.  Front is still doing well and should last the life of the second rear.

Greg
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Offline DEMBONES

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #3 on: February 09, 2020, 11:34:38 PM
*Originally Posted by fastnlight [+]
So I just replaced the rear tire at 3100 miles.   I knew the rocky riding up north was hard on that tire, but after a spirited few hundred miles of twisty riding and warm tire temperatures.  I inspected the rear while hot and saw a few gaping cuts between the tread blocks that just didn't make me feel too confident.  The rear tread at center was down just below 4mm, and should have gone over 5k without too much trouble.  I bought another Trek rider and its now back on the road.   Still think its the best 50/50 tire for a rider who wants the best off pavement capability while sacrificing the least amount of road feel and handling.  Front is still doing well and should last the life of the second rear.

Greg

Boy...I dunno...3100 miles and done?  That's far too few for me to pony up for.  I'm bummed out that I have to change tires every 5K.

On a side note it's interesting to me that many have publicly crucified Shinko tires for developing splits/cracks with hard use and yet this seems to demonstrate that any tire that is abused will eventually fail.  The Shinko's are far less money to purchase and a better bargain IMO.

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Offline fastnlight

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #4 on: February 10, 2020, 03:39:59 AM
My replacement at 3100 was very proactive and after that tire experienced some unusual riding surfaces.  After one earier intense trip of off pavement riding for days in normal gravel and mud and packed dirt, the tire was in perfect shape and having no issues at all.   Up north on the island, we did a lot of dirt riding and found quite a few stretches of recently repaired road (washouts) that were filled at least temporarily with a large fist to softball sized angular volcanic rocks, with no smaller fill.  Those stretches were so sharp and pokey, I was immediately worried for the tires.  the spacing on the tread are pretty large, and those rocks looked so fresh and sharp.  The normal trips I have done across the west for the last 15 years did not have that tough a surface for tire health. 

In normal off pavement riding I think they would wear fine and you would get 5-6k miles on them, which is all I have been able to get from other sets of tires that were this good off pavement.  For the feel these have I the road sections, I would be willing to live with even less.

Nearly all of the hate on shinkos I have heard, has been for some version of the 705 series.  But I have heard a lot of positive reviews of them as well.  I have burned through 3 sets of them myself on two bikes and had no issues other than proving they do not like mud.  The 800 series are also a great set for playing in the dirt, but they did not have enough road feel to do the VFRX justice on the road.  And the E07s I have run on this bike and others, are great and capable, but they still don't have the road feel of the trekriders.  The next set I may be trying for this bike, is the Dunlop missions.

Greg

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Offline Banksy

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #5 on: February 10, 2020, 08:20:44 AM
Thanks for the update Greg. These sound like my next set of tyres. I'm still on the stock Bridgestones, have 4k on them and am starting to look at alternative's. For me the Bridgestones don't enspire confidence in wet conditions lacking feel.
If they last 6k I'd be happy.

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Offline DEMBONES

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #6 on: February 11, 2020, 04:25:59 AM
*Originally Posted by fastnlight [+]
My replacement at 3100 was very proactive and after that tire experienced some unusual riding surfaces.  After one earier intense trip of off pavement riding for days in normal gravel and mud and packed dirt, the tire was in perfect shape and having no issues at all.   Up north on the island, we did a lot of dirt riding and found quite a few stretches of recently repaired road (washouts) that were filled at least temporarily with a large fist to softball sized angular volcanic rocks, with no smaller fill.  Those stretches were so sharp and pokey, I was immediately worried for the tires.  the spacing on the tread are pretty large, and those rocks looked so fresh and sharp.  The normal trips I have done across the west for the last 15 years did not have that tough a surface for tire health. 

In normal off pavement riding I think they would wear fine and you would get 5-6k miles on them, which is all I have been able to get from other sets of tires that were this good off pavement.  For the feel these have I the road sections, I would be willing to live with even less.

Nearly all of the hate on shinkos I have heard, has been for some version of the 705 series.  But I have heard a lot of positive reviews of them as well.  I have burned through 3 sets of them myself on two bikes and had no issues other than proving they do not like mud.  The 800 series are also a great set for playing in the dirt, but they did not have enough road feel to do the VFRX justice on the road.  And the E07s I have run on this bike and others, are great and capable, but they still don't have the road feel of the trekriders.  The next set I may be trying for this bike, is the Dunlop missions.

Greg

Where do you buy them and how much for the pair, F/R?

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Offline Banksy

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Re: Avon Trekriders
Reply #7 on: February 11, 2020, 08:12:35 PM
Greg, can you let me know if the Avon's are T rated or V rated you have fitted.

Avon list both ratings in our sizes but I can only find T rated rears when searching for them online..

Many thanks...