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Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT  (Read 1699 times)

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Offline Grabcon

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2017, 02:25:00 AM »
Creature. Thanks but I found that it takes a bit of time to absorb what is read in this book. It is certainly not something you will read in a night over a couple of pints.
In The Barn
2016 VFR1200X - Mine, 2008 VFR800 ABS - The wife's bike, 1976 CB750F - For Sale, Brad

Online creature

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2017, 10:00:11 AM »
True, I did not even dared to think to do it in one nite especially drinking. Fortunately though there many drawings and pics that makes it shorter and easier in a way.
In any case it’s very well written and provides thorough details, thanks again  :152:
Honda XL 125 R PD - Yamaha XT 400 - Yamaha XT 600 R - Yamaha XJ6 Diversion - Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R - Yamaha FZS 1000 - Honda XL 700 Transalp

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Offline DEMBONES

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2017, 05:49:06 PM »
*Originally Posted by creature [+]
Reading this and other topics I do agree with whom says that the best money are spent on suspensions. I am at my 9 bike (all japs) and on all the
- the front cartridge, looks really good, however the Andreani one (Öhlins by the way) is a lot cheaper.

I'm learning that the Andreani cartridge front suspension for the CT uses progressive springs.  I am inquiring direct from Italy if they can swap out to linear but it doesn't sound like it.  The Andreani rep says that they use different spring configurations for different bikes and the CT gets progressives.

Argh!    :157:

Online creature

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2017, 08:20:14 PM »
Interesting, won’t go for progressive springs.

 :460:

Most likely I’ll just change oil (denser) and springs (with higher K) as I have done on all my previous bikes.
Honda XL 125 R PD - Yamaha XT 400 - Yamaha XT 600 R - Yamaha XJ6 Diversion - Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R - Yamaha FZS 1000 - Honda XL 700 Transalp

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Offline Big Bob

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2017, 06:37:36 AM »
I'm a big guy (160kg) and I ride it offroad and two up as well.

Here are the options as far as I'm concerned

Front Forks
1. Get Racetech Valves and upgraded Linear Springs
2. Get Basic Cartridge replacement 20mm (like Anderetti or Matris)  This gives you compression adjustment as well as rebound adjustment which is handy
3. Get Bigger 25mm Cartridge Like Mupo.  Much more expense but the cartridge is 20% wider giving beter control
https://www.ebay.ie/itm/Honda-Crosstourer-2011-2014-VFR1200X-Mupo-Fork-Cartridge-Springs-Kit-LCRR-New-/302430717576


Online creature

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2017, 02:10:52 PM »
MUPO is excellent, but I really wonder if our average usage is worth the money...

What about the rear shock? You did not mention your considered options.
What do you reckon about the basic MUPO shock with extra preload adjuster?
It gives also the opportunity to increase the shock length  :305:
Honda XL 125 R PD - Yamaha XT 400 - Yamaha XT 600 R - Yamaha XJ6 Diversion - Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R - Yamaha FZS 1000 - Honda XL 700 Transalp

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Offline Grabcon

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2017, 02:27:02 PM »
Before I would go changing anything I would reevaluate the bike to see if it is suited for the max weight between you and pillion. According to my owners manual the max weight capacity, (I am assuming rider, pillion and gear) is 180 kg (397 lbs). Please don't take this the wrong way but like you stated you are a big guy. You are within 20.5 kg (45 lbs) of that max weight.

I am not sure it reworking the suspension is money well spent.
In The Barn
2016 VFR1200X - Mine, 2008 VFR800 ABS - The wife's bike, 1976 CB750F - For Sale, Brad

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Re: Need help with suspension upgrade options for CT
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2017, 02:46:33 PM »
*Originally Posted by Grabcon [+]
Before I would go changing anything I would reevaluate the bike to see if it is suited for the max weight between you and pillion. According to my owners manual the max weight capacity, (I am assuming rider, pillion and gear) is 180 kg (397 lbs). Please don't take this the wrong way but like you stated you are a big guy. You are within 20.5 kg (45 lbs) of that max weight.

I am not sure it reworking the suspension is money well spent.

Talking about personal experience and way ahead, which does not mean it is the rule to follow, of course.
However, just to be clear, because I probably skipped some of my mind processes, what I usually do is the following:
1. Try the bike as it is for a while in all driving conditions (alone, with luggage, with pillion, with pillion and luggage);
2. Set up the suspensions trying to get the best setup with the OEM ones;
3. When the suspensions need maintenance, basically after two years average (I ride the bike every day and I run an average of 20k km per year) I decide what to do;

Talking/dreaming about expensive solutions costs nothing, but in the end for my average usage I personally find worthy going for:
- oil plus spring on the fork;
- either change oil and spring on the shock, or change it with something not too sophisticated but good value for money (WP, MUPO, etc.)  :305:
Honda XL 125 R PD - Yamaha XT 400 - Yamaha XT 600 R - Yamaha XJ6 Diversion - Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R - Yamaha FZS 1000 - Honda XL 700 Transalp

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